The Perspective of Justice

Respecting Creation

The parable of the sower is a story about the fruitfulness of the earth. It assures us that the harvest will come in spite of the many obstacles that stand in the way. In the end, the rocks and birds and trampling feet cannot nullify the fact that “the seed that falls on good ground will yield a fruitful harvest.”

Paul talks about the salvation of the world, pointing out that “the world itself will be freed from its slavery to corruption and share in the glorious freedom of the children of God.”

Meanwhile, “all creation groans and is in agony”: we pollute the clear air and the fresh water; we drive plants and animals to extinction; we clear-cut forests and we strip-mine, leaving ugly scars in the land. 
The opening prayer calls on us “to reject what is contrary to the gospel.” Isn’t it contrary to the “good news” to waste and destroy God’s creation? The Creator has “greatly enriched the land.” How dare we impoverish it!

The commiment of believers to a healthy environment for everyone stems directly from their belief in God the Creator, from their recognition of the effects of original and personal sin, and from the certainty of having been redeemed by Christ. Respect for life and for the dignity of the human person extends also to the rest of creation, which is called to join man in praising God.

Pope John Paul II, World Day of Peace Message, 1990:16.

Gerald Darring

Now published in book form, To Love and Serve: Lectionary Based Meditations, by Gerald Darring This entire three year cycle is available at Amazon.com.

 

**From Saint Louis University

Kristin Clauson